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Groundwater: The Facts You Need to Know

Are you looking at developing a plot of land, constructing a new home or building or installing a well? If so, you’ll know that something you have to consider is the presence, volume and quality of groundwater. Groundwater is present all around us and can affect land development, yet there are so many pervasive myths and misunderstandings about it. Here the top facts that you should know about groundwater.

Groundwater Fact #1: Groundwater is defined as water that occurs underground in cracks and pores in soil and rock, below the topsoil layer. Groundwater travels naturally via aquifers, which are geological formations in the ground.

Groundwater Fact #2: Groundwater is not the water found in rivers, lakes or other bodies of water. It only occurs in the aforementioned small spaces in the ground. It gets there when rain and melting snow and ice seep into the ground, beyond the top layers of soil.

Groundwater Fact #3: Some aquifers are so large they supply water to hundreds of thousands—and even millions—of people. For example, the Edwards aquifer in Texas supplies water for nearly two million people. The Mahomet Aquifer in Illinois supplies water to over 800,000 people.

Groundwater Fact #4: Humans are highly dependent on groundwater. Of all the water on earth, only 1 percent is available or suitable for human use, and of that 1 percent, 99 percent is groundwater. That’s a lot of groundwater that we’re using!

Groundwater Fact #5: Rural households are the most dependent on groundwater for drinking water than urban residents. This is because many rural homes rely on groundwater to supply their wells with water, though most wells are drilled or dug deep enough to also draw water from further below the groundwater level.

Groundwater Fact #6: Like water from any other source, groundwater may naturally contain unwanted substances and have to go through treatment before it’s deemed safe to drink. Some of the most common substances found naturally in groundwater include calcium, magnesium, salt and iron.

Groundwater Fact #7: Groundwater may also be contaminated because of human activity. Oil and chemical spills, pesticides and agricultural runoff can all cause groundwater to become unsafe for human use until it goes through a remediation process.

Groundwater Fact #8: Groundwater doesn’t just hydrate humans—it keeps bodies of water from going thirsty as well. Groundwater serves as a recharger for rivers and lakes, topping them up and helping to maintain levels.

These are just a few of the many interesting facts about groundwater. To learn more about groundwater, and the importance of knowing the volume, depth and yield of groundwater sources before you call the well drillers, visit American Water Surveyors today.

February 16, 2017 at 8:28 am Comments (0)

Understanding Seismoelectrics and Making this Technology Work for You

Finding Groundwater Sources

Do you know how to go about locating a groundwater source, before you call in the well drillers? Although drilling is an effective method of finding groundwater, it is also very costly. Even when water is found using this method, it is difficult to determine the yield and depth of the groundwater source. Divining water sources using a “water witch”, is kind of like a “magician” telling you what location is best suited for drilling, is extremely risky, although it is a practice that is still used today. Relying on a stick or a “feeling” to locate groundwater can cost you dearly. You are charged by the foot whether or not a driller drills a dry well, and without knowing how much water is in the location of your choice, you can quickly pump your well dry during an emergency or through prolonged use.

The Technology of Seismoelectrics

Rather than leaving it all up to magic, placing your faith in physics will lead you to the groundwater sources that you need. Seismoelectrics is the modern technique of choice when it comes to locating groundwater sources, and is much more dependable and informative than past techniques ever were. The GF3500 seismoelectric survey instrument detects electrical signals generated by the passage of seismic impulses through layered rocks, sediments and soils. The depths from which these signals originate can also be estimated. In order to estimate water table depth, the downward transition from a disordered signal geometry to signals having a focused radial symmetry are noted. The lateral variability of aquifers is mapped by calculating systematic surveys along traverses or in grids. Used in conjunction with a seismic source that creates sharp sound pulses, the GF3500 seismoelectric survey instrument can determine where and how the sound is moving. There are various factors that contribute to the collection of pertinent data, including: signal strength as a function of all three spatial coordinates and time, power line noise field strength, antenna impedance, as well as source and receiver coupling. All of this and more allows for the accurate mapping of groundwater sources, including the depth and yield without taking part in any unnecessary digging. With this technology you can tell your well drillers exactly where to drill, and be confident that you will get the highest yielding location for a well.

Contact American Water Surveyors Today

Do not start any costly drilling before determining the groundwater depth, yield and suitability for your potential well. At American Water Surveyors, we use state-of-the- art technology to ensure that you will find the groundwater you need. Call today to save time, money and headaches. Don’t guess where the water is; be sure by relying on our seismoelectric technology. Visit us online, call us at 1-877-SEISMO1 (734-7661), or email us at info@wefindwater.com today to find out more information.

February 3, 2017 at 10:01 am Comments (0)